My Final Blog Post to the Recruiting Industry.


A short time ago, I received a notification from WordPress that my recruiting blog that has been largely neglected has reached 10,000 views. I’m not sure what to think about that since I’ve moved away from blogging about the recruitment industry and began serving my niche within recruiting instead.  Some time ago, I began the process of attempting to help people, who like me, were tired and frustrated with recruiting. I set out on a mission to show them how I went from a self-loathing contingency recruiter to a self-respecting Retained Search Consultant. I truly believed that there would be many people eager to learn how to move from frustration and failure to fulfillment and success. What I learned through this well-meaning yet naive endeavor is that many of the people in the industry are perfectly content with this way of working and defend it with venom and malice.

Far be it from me to tell someone that there is a more rewarding and effective way to earn a living than what they’re doing now. The irony is that they vehemently defend the very practices that undermine their own professional existence. Much to my surprise after running a few blog pieces extolling the virtues of Retained Search and highlighting some of the many pitfalls and failures of contingency search, I received aggressive ad hominem attacks against me. I haven’t been called some of these pearls since I was in middle school. Classy bunch these folks are!  Apparently, a handful people were deeply offended by some of my assertions and rather than prove me wrong, they resorted to all sorts of slurs and slanders. I welcome criticism as long as it is coming from a place of honesty and its intent is constructive. That wasn’t the case. It became a “mob mentality” of heaping insults and ridiculous assumptions. It became clear to me that most of the people were not trying to learn or grow, but to defend a practice that I was calling out as deeply flawed and needing be abandoned. These people seem to have convinced themselves that contingency recruiting is good for them and their clients. They have drunk the Kool-aid and have been drawn down a self destructive path where neither they nor their clients gain what is truly in everyone’s best interests. Either I failed to make my point, or they weren’t ready for the truth.

You can read some of my posts and determine for yourself. Some of what I said was intended to get people to think critically. I spoke about the only metric that matters being the ongoing value the “placed” professional has on the company you place them and some were very adamant that this is outside of their control and therefore they are not to be held responsible for what happens after the check is cashed and their 30 day guarantee expired. I wrote on the pitfalls of contingency search carrying very negative “unintended consequences,” and was told that I must have been an abject failure if I was drawing such conclusions. It became obvious to me that my time was being wasted on the likes of these.

The only conclusion that I am left to draw is that many tenured recruiters simply don’t care or aren’t willing to take any responsibility for their actions. In their minds, they did their job and were done as soon as the candidate was hired and that’s all that matters. All else happened apart from their influence and they are not culpable for any mis-hire. However, if you are a true partner with your clients, you cannot hold yourself harmless from your client’s bad hire. Shall we use the “But For” clause to demonstrate this? But for the actions of the recruiter, the company never would have made the bad hire. You see it can work for or against you. I guess no matter how much I may try to elevate our industry, well known for its questionable ethical standards, change requires one’s admission that they are doing something wrong. We all know that this is impossible for some to actualize.

I heard from some angry people via Recruiting Blogs who claimed to fill 20% – 70% of their searches. While that might impress some, it still means that around 50% of their activity ends without any reward or fulfillment. That still means that the majority of your work ends up on the “cutting room floor.”

My advice to younger recruiters is to learn the art of retained search and leave the garbage for those dinosaurs who need it to survive.

So this will be my last Recruiting Blog Post. I have begun another blog focusing on the industry that I serve and in a very short time, the feedback from people has been very positive. You see, I am passionate about helping others. Yet the recruiting industry is not a very nice place to offer to help. Perhaps some people just are defensive and fight back rather than look for ways to grow. Maybe they don’t want to work as hard as it takes to move over to Retained Search. Or maybe they can’t imagine anything could be better than the scraps from the dumpster. Whatever the reason, it is time to put my writing efforts toward a more receptive arena.

I’ll continue blogging on more interesting topics at http://www.tdg-llc.com/our-blog

I leave you with a compelling piece on the subject by Marcus Cauchi entitled “Contingency Recruitment is Dead. Long Live Retainers!”   http://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20141125183655-1301861-contingency-recruitment-is-dead-long-live-retainers

God bless!

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Breaking Free from Contingency Search into Retained.


Here is a three minute excerpt from the Big Biller presentation on Next Level Recruiter Training.

In this video, I share the process I went through taking my contingency recruiting firm to a full retained firm.  It is not for every recruiter, but those who move into this way of doing business always find it to be more fulfilling and rewarding. What have you got to lose?

Why I Don’t “Prep” My Candidates for Interviews


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I had an interesting experience recently that reminded me why I don’t “prep” my candidates prior to them having an interview with my clients. I’ve been doing senior level searches over the past several years, but as I have recently been working on some Sales Consultant searches for a dear friend, I am once again reminded of the incredible power of a Candidate Prep Call. Vice President and CEO level people generally don’t need to be coached or prepped for an interview. In most cases,  I prep my clients on what they must do to capture the imagination of the senior level candidate.  However, in lower level searches the Prep Call before an interview can seem a lot more like “insider trading” than simple prep call.

As part of the standard Recruiter training protocol, “Prepping a Candidate for a client interview” is as routine an aspect of the recruiting process as the “Candidate Debrief Call.” So, then why do I say that I don’t prep my candidates before an interview? I have long-held the view that by preparing a candidate for an interview with your client, you introduce bias into the process and make the job of vetting the candidates by your client far more difficult. In fact, by doing so, you introduce a profound conundrum which enhances the candidates’ ability to tailor their approach and directly address precisely what your clients are looking for. Why is this bad? It actually undermines the process by giving your candidates an unreasonable advantage in the interview process enabling them to misrepresent their actual abilities with their “super human intelligence” provided by an insider. With preparation from an insider, they can become a better version of themselves. You may think that if you prep “all” of your candidates the same way, then you have “evened the score” making it equal, but while that may be true as it relates to your candidates having equal access to the information, it fails to recognize that what your client needs most from you is an accurate representation of the candidates’ real and natural talent. And this directly undermines this exposure.  In another blog, entitled, “Why Contingency Recruiters’ Candidates So Stinking Good?” I point out that recruiters greatly bias the interview process toward their own candidates when they prepare their candidates prior to an interview by telling them all of the nuances and details that the hiring manager is looking for. For example: “display fire in the belly passion” “make sure you ask for the job” “demonstrate your ability to ____________,” and other such things. It is as if the Recruiter gives a script to the candidates to perform in a play. The very things that the hiring manager told the recruiter he/she was looking for in a candidate gets spelled out in vivid detail. Irrespective of their actual talent, behaviors, and communication, they will follow the lead of the Recruiter who gave them the “insider’s view” of what the manager is actually looking for in explicit detail.  It’s as if an insider in a prospective target sales account gave your Sales Rep the exact road map to the hidden motivations and desires of the decision-maker. What Sales Rep wouldn’t be effective in selling to a prospect whom they have been carefully and meticulously informed of all their hot-buttons, likes and dislikes?  Any Sales Rep worth their salt would give a compelling presentation given such “insider” information. Why then is this bad? Because this is not a “real life” scenario. A competent Sales professional needs to qualify their prospect and elegantly ascertain the wants and needs that are most important to them in assessing a product or service. The Sales Rep must then present their product or service offering to the prospect and ensure that there is adequate disclosure and that any questions or concerns are appropriately overcome with information or demonstrations to dispel doubt and bring about a positive agreement that their products/services meet their prospect’s needs effectively. Then they must close the sale. However if a Recruiter carefully crafts all the objections and concerns for the prospective candidate in advance of the interview, how is that really giving the hiring manager an accurate representation of their true sales abilities? This is what I mean by saying that Prepping Candidates always biases the hiring process and actually undermines the objective of finding the best possible talent and fit.

So let’s consider why “Prepping Candidates” is such a widely accepted behavior of Recruiters everywhere.  First, this makes YOU look good!  When all your candidates perform well in their first interview, it reflects upon you as each of your candidates is well prepared in advance and their polish is a testament to your thoroughness. At the surface, this is true. However, what is the true objective of the search in the first place?  Is it to make you look good or earn a fee quickly?  Maybe it is for you. If you are a recruiter and you know that the only way you will be compensated for all your time and effort, you must take advantage of every means necessary to ensure that your candidate gets hired. If you’re like me, you notice that there is a subtle, yet profound conflict of interests if the Recruiter ever does anything that is not in the best interests of the client. Why is this conflict of interest present you may ask? It is my belief that in part it is due to the prevalence of Contingency Search. Contingency Search has several unintended consequences that elevate the risk of a company making a bad hire. By removing the Contingency terms, recruiters are able to operate as an extension of the company and not out of fear of being “stiffed” out of their fee.  Contingency Search has many potential pitfalls that recruiters must attempt to avoid. (backdoor hire, candidates who circumvent them, resume timing, active candidates etc.) But I also believe that recruiters tend to be transient and not terribly interested in the long-term success of their clients. One of the most bizarre ironies in recruiting industry is the incredibly high turnover and short tenure. I know of no other industry with such difficulty keeping people in the industry. The failure rate of rookie recruiters is over 90% by most accounts. So one might assume that if someone makes it past their first year, they do it right. Right? Wrong!

I’ve been accused of being heretical in my stance on Candidate Prepping. I guess I don’t get it.  All I ever want to do is what is truly in the best interests of my clients to mitigate as much risk of a bad hire that I possibly can. And what better way than to find the best people I possibly can attract given the company’s value proposition and introduce them to the company and later to the hiring manager. The rest is up to the candidate to conduct their own due diligence, research the company, its products and opportunity. It is up to them to manage their own performance in the way that comes to them naturally. Because that is exactly how they will perform on the job. So, whether it is prepping them by telling them to make sure they scour the client’s website and study the products to reading the last three or four press releases so that can be more prepared or advising them how to follow-up after the interview with an email to the hiring manager.  These are things that the Top Performers should do without the need of a recruiter coaching them.

Some Recruiters have laughed out-loud at me and told me that if I don’t prep my candidates, all my work is in vain and that I need to protect my investment of time. They’ve told me that I won’t be able to make a living and that they will run circles around me while I go out of business. Yet after 14 years in the business and the last 10 plus working on retainer this way, I remain convinced that what I am doing and more importantly NOT doing is in the best interests of my clients. And they keep calling me when they have new searches. In the last year, over 80% of our new searches have come from repeat customers. Keep in mind, we are not the “low-cost provider” in the market. While others settle for flat fees and lower percentages, we hold firmly to our rates, because  I believe that in the end, it isn’t about “Cost” but “Value.” The greatest value we can provide is helping our clients hire the absolute best person they possibly can. We believe the best way that they can make an educated decision and discern which candidate is best is through allowing our candidates to come as they are rather than how someone wants them to be. Unless you remove the contingency factor from this scenario, I don’t believe you can properly align your recruiter’s priorities with the company. At the same time, merely removing the contingency factor does not ensure you that your recruiter will not Prep their candidates and bias the process. Every hiring manager should work with someone who they trust to have their best interests at heart and be committed to their success beyond making a hire and earning their fee.

Back to my recent experience conducting the Sales Consultant searches; a few of the candidates came in less than armed to the T with all the preparation that one would hope for. My friend and client saw the shortcomings of a few of my candidates. While it would have made me look better to prep them, in the end he had an accurate representation of each candidate which equipped him to make the best informed decision relative to who best fit the role and had the talent to represent his company in the designated territories. However tempting it might have been to make myself look better by prepping the candidates, that isn’t the highest goal when retained by a client who trusts me to help them hire the best.

Technology: And The Marginalization of Recruiters


With the advent of the Internet, many suspected that it would change the way companies recruit talent. It is impossible to deny the dramatic changes that have been seen with online capabilities from job boards like meddevicejobs.com to individual company career web pages and social media. These innovations have enabled previously unattainable reach by candidates and recruiters, both agency and internal. Newer web apps like Jobfox and Bounty Jobs have pushed recruiters further to the margins of the recruitment process and many are being relegated to that of little more than a data miner.

Technology has put us in direct competition with our clients. So what is a recruiter to do? If you want to, you can still make a living playing from the margins. Of course, in order to do this effectively, you must work on a higher volume which means spreading yourself thin and compromising quality. Working on higher volumes means you have no choice except to take significant shortcuts in the recruiting and vetting process. If you disagree, perhaps it’s because you’ve only known one way of working. Many recruiters fail to recognize how this approach actually undermines their own value to their clients. This is an undeniable fact. Yet, for some, that is a way of life and they will defend it to the end. Here’s the problem, if you have to worry that either your clients or another recruiter may find the same candidate you did online, you are in trouble unless you are a glutton for punishment or really fast on the draw.

Essentially, you are in a race with your client and or other recruiters for the active candidates on the open market. You are being marginalized because you aren’t bringing them anything that they cannot get by themselves. Sure some clients don’t have internal recruiters and that is your saving grace. If they did, they wouldn’t need you anymore at all. This is by definition, “Marginalization.” And because so many recruiters have been relegated to these margins, they are little more than researchers or data-miners. As the internet becomes more evolved and newer applications making data mining resumes easier, recruiters will become less necessary driving their fees lower still.

If you are working on contingency, you are more than likely being marginalized. The solution to your problem isn’t doing more placements, but in elevating your game and distinguishing yourself as a solution provider rather than a mere data miner. If you stay where you are, you’ll be lucky to stay in business as technology continues to take over.